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KALSANG
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ANYWHERE YOU WANT TO GO
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CHEMI

 
Tibetan Wild Yak Adventures
ONE-ON-ONE - PRIVATE GUIDES

   
   

ABOUT US

 
   

 

 
In 2008, after witnessing the Tibetan culture and customs over a two month period, part of which was working in a Tibetan orphanage, I felt compelled to do something to help. Under Chinese occupation, it is very difficult for Tibetans to find work. Many do not speak Chinese, although it is the only language taught in most schools. Younger Tibetans, who can afford to pay school fees, will be better off if they learn the Mandarin Chinese language, but not by much. Most businesses are Chinese owned and it comes naturally to hire Chinese. Tibetans, at least a few, have found their niche in the tourist industry. By studying English in China and abroad, many Tibetans work as tour guides for tour companies all over the Tibetan areas of China. So the tour company has a website and offers tours, coordinates the itinerary, gets the client, then hires a driver with a car and a tour guide to conduct the tour. That works great for everyone, especially groups. But I had another idea.

While I was there during the downward spiral of tourism due to confusing and at times, impossible permit regulations, I realized how difficult it was for tour guides to survive. As I was lucky enough to hire a private guide for my two months in the area, for a very reasonable fee, I thought other travelers may be interested in having the same option. There are those travelers who only feel secure traveling with a group, and there are those independent travelers who only enjoy traveling solo. But in China, in Tibet, in Mongolia, unless you speak the language, your trip can become a living nightmare. When I was there on my own without a word of Chinese or Tibetan, I realized how helpless I was. I couldn't go outside to buy water or fruit, or heavens, order a meal or find a toilet on my own without being frightened, at least uncomfortable. I may have been able to survive and see some sites by using a local travel agency, but once I had a personal guide everything changed. At my service 24/7, I was able to go about like a local, pay local prices, find the best places to eat, see how the locals lived, even go dancing in the local park! Everything became suddenly a joy! He explained the menu. He ordered. He took photographs while I rolled the video camera. He bought bus tickets and took me to a nature reserve and nunnery. We met locals. I ate with nuns, farmers and nomads. We shopped and dined and explored with ease because he was local, he knew the places to go and how to get there.

The value of learning the culture, traditions and customs from a local cannot be compared. Unlike a normal tour, I was able to ask all the questions I wanted over Tsampa and hot yak butter tea in several Tibetan restaurants. We discussed many subjects of interest to travelers, all my questions answered, at least from his viewpoint and information level. And he helped me with all my shopping! Without him, I would have LOOKED AT Tibet. With him, I lived the life of a Tibetan, well, sort of. It wasn't just about seeing sites and being able to say I've been to Tibet. It was about experiencing the culture first hand, and that made all the difference in the world. Whether you're going for a few days or a few months, a private guide in this land is indispensable. And one of the best parts, is you get a killer deal and your payment goes directly to the Tibetan guide, who otherwise may not have a livelihood. So, that's why I offered to make this site. It started with my two wonderful guides, Kalsang from Xining and Chemi from Lhasa, but I decided to open it up to all experienced Tibetan guides with recommendations. So if you are that independent traveler planning a trip to Tibet, please contact us. Depending on where you want to go, we can steer you to a good private guide who will make your trip a true Tibetan experience.
 

Or meet our guides and contact them directly. MEET OUR GUIDES.

If you are a guide and want to be posted, please send your photo and bio along with your work history and references. Once your references have been checked, we will post your services for free. Click here.

 
   
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
       

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DISCLAIMER: The data on this website is the collaborative experience by both travel professionals and non-professionals, contributions, and research of various websites,  books,  documents, research, articles, associates, attorneys,  etc. The information on this site may or may not be accurate or up to date. The primary purpose of this site is education and service. We do not advocate any specific course of action, but offer ideas to think about. What you do with this information and any course of action you decide to take, if any, is entirely your responsibility. We wish you happy travels.